12 ways to inspire…

12 ways to Inspire…

One of the greatest feelings in leadership has to be being told that you have inspired others. It’s a magical feeling that brings an incredible sense of achievement and pride and shines a light on the impact you have on others.
Long after the bricks and mortar you helped to build have been bulldozed, the policies and processes you oversaw been replaced and the shareholders you appeased found a new focus for their investments, your ability to inspire will enable you to leave your greatest leadership legacy.
Being inspired makes people reach for the unattainable, try harder than ever before, and stand up for what your organisation stands for in the face of adversity. It means that your people talk about the lessons they learned from you, the responsibility you empowered in them and that your values and approach live on. Think about your best boss…
That’s great, but how do you do ‘it’
That’s great, but how do you do ‘it’; inspire others? Here’s 12 ways that I’ve seen work wonders on the inspiration front. Let me know if you can think of more.
1) Do what you say you will do
Too often we promise things in the heat of the moment to appease and maintain credibility. When we fail to fulfil our promises we begin to erode the belief your people have in everything you say.
2) Treat people equally but differently
Your people have an internal sense of what is right and fair. The treatment of others in a way that creates the impression of favourites within your people, for example, will create a divide. When your people feel that they will be treated equally but that they will be considered as individuals with individual needs, they will come together.
3) Provide quality time
Nothing says more to your people about how much you value them than the amount of time (no matter how busy you are) that you are willing to spend with them; especially when it adds value.
4) Discuss your own weaknesses and your journey to overcome adversity
We tend to share less about ourselves, when we feel that we have done all of the opening up. As a leader the ability to share your journey and the challenges you have faced means that your people will believe that they can fulfil their potential and that you won’t judge them on the road to success. 
5) Listen to your people
When you take the time to listen to your people they feel valued, you learn, they learn and you connect to a much greater level. Think about how you feel when someone listens to you and how different it feels when you’re talked at. 
6) Help people overcome the barriers they face
People feel great when they are doing something they feel good at and it feels like nothing can get in their way. When you help your people to unlock the door to their success they and you feel great and you will have empowered the individual or team to deliver the value they seek. In turn, you will have created a connection with those you’ve helped that will last a lifetime.
7)  Ask other people for their suggestions
None of us have all of the answers and to pretend otherwise is fool hardy. When you seek the suggestions of those around you, you say I value you and believe in your capability.
8) Demonstrate belief in others by giving them responsibility for important stuff
Remember how it felt the first time your parents let you go into town on your own? Your people feel this way every time you empower them to make decisions and take action – no matter how senior.
9) Thank others for making mistakes
This recognises that your people are human, that they had the bravery to try and that you value initiative. What’s more it means they’ll try again and no doubt succeed beyond even their wildest dreams.
10) Invite feedback from your people
This demonstrates openness, respect and a lack of ego and you’ll get some valuable insights into how you can be an even better leader too.
11) Be your values
It’s easy say what you stand for and far less to act congruently at all times, but you have to or at least acknowledge when you haven’t. To act in a way that flies in the face of what you say undermines everything you say. For o leader there is no such thing as “do as I say, not as I do”.
12) Hold people to account

It is a human trait to choose the path of least resistance and it’s far too easy to say “if you want it bad enough you’ll make it happen”. We all fall off the horse sometimes and (maybe not in the moment) in the long term we’re usually grateful that someone challenged us to get back on it.
13) Let people be they best that THEY can be

I thought I’d throw in an extra one for free – you’re unlucky to be in the end of this one.

Its one thing to develop and empower your people; quite another to seek to create mini me’s. The very thing that stands out about you inspires others is your individual character. So bring out the best in them and let their light shine. 

If you’d like to talk through…

If you or your people would like to talk through any of the above, drop me a note or a call, I’d love to speak with you

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

What my clients have said…

“I always come away from a meeting with Stefan re-energized, re-focussed and brimming with enthusiasm for the world. Not only is he insightful, provocative and intelligent in his comments & questions … he’s also great company!”

Joanna Moyle – Director – Iviva Consulting

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials

What is coaching?

What is coaching?

In a recent article in the financial times – Petra Wilton, director of strategy and external affairs at The Chartered Management Institute said “Many chief executives and senior managers wish they had had coaching earlier in their careers”. She went in to highlight the benefit of a coaching approach in leadership, stating that “One of the mega-trends in management that CMI is currently exploring is the shift from controlling to coaching management cultures…when it comes to getting the best out of teams and fully engaging employees, a coaching style gets results”.

High praise indeed. Based upon the level of interest, blogs, books and training courses that have been developed in its name, you’d anticipate that we’d be getting clearer on what coaching is. The reality is somewhat less clear. 

So, what’s my view?

Having coached professionally for many years now, in many organisations, settings and topics, my view is that;

Coaching is a highly effective way of helping senior managers and their teams build on the success they are seeing and think through and overcome the challenges they face. 

Largely based upon facilitating a coachee to identify for themselves how to bring about success, the skill of a coach is to empower those they coach to achieve success, in the main, through effective questioning, insightful feedback, challenge and support.

How does coaching work?

An effective coach will enable you to view a situation from different perspectives and in turn gain a greater level of clarity on what you want to achieve and really test your commitment to attaining it. 

Once you’ve clarified and committed to your goals, a key element of coaching is to explore your current reality and identify what the true gap is between where you are and where you want to be. As part of this, a coach will help you to acknowledge the strengths that have helped you to get to where you are and may draw out the blockers to your success. 

Having identified your strengths and (as necessary) blockers, you will often systematically work through these to ensure you leave no stone unturned, be it identifying new behaviours or helping you address the internal barriers that hold you back.

Once clear on the performance or behavioural gap, it’s now time to identify a range of options for moving forward. Here a coach will help you to generate as many ideas as possible, using a variety of methods and perspectives. A key element of helping you to accelerate the progress you make is by getting you to evaluate the options you’ve come up with before committing to a way forward. This enables you to identify, at the outset, the approaches you believe will have the greatest likelihood of bringing you success. 

The coach as Angel or Devils advocate…

The final but one stage within a coaching session is to commit to what you’re actually going to do and how and to agree when and how you’ll review your progress. This stage of coaching is about helping you to ensure that you hold yourself to account and carry out the actions you’ve decided upon. After all how many times have you known what to do and still not done it? Turning thought into action is a key outcome of coaching.

A significant part of coaching is to identify the right level of challenge (devils advocate) and support (angel on your shoulder) needed by the coachee to take the steps they identify. All too often in life we are capable of having what we want, the role of the coach is to ensure that we don’t take the easy route out or pretend to ourselves that we are doing everything we can, including making tough decisions, to move forward.
The final stage of coaching is to… 

Having identified a way forward, committed to an action plan with dates and deliverables defined, a coaching session will often end with the coach and coachee agreeing a date for the next session, during which the actions agreed and progress made will be evaluated and a goal for that session defined and worked through as above.
Couldn’t I just coach myself?
The short answer is that you could ‘sort of’ do it for yourself, I self coach on many occasions – however – the questions to consider are:
  • Do you? 
  • How effectively? 
  • How often? 
  • When don’t you?
  • What stops you?
  • What if a professional coach could help you do it quicker, more efficiently or ‘just’ made you make the time to do it?
One of my most challenging clients once said to me that he never realised how inefficient he was at strategising what next to do with his business until he spent half a day working with me.

A highly skilled coach uses questions, listening, reflection, summarising and paraphrasing and a high level of experience in recognising and reflecting back to you the values and beliefs and habitual behaviours that you hold you back from achieving your potential.
You may be conscious or unconscious that these values, beliefs and habitual behaviours are helping you or getting in the way of your success. Even highly experienced coaches have coaches to help them to work with their blind spots and to help them to apply their strengths to a greater degree.
The twist; a coaches experience
The great thing about coaching is its ability to facilitate change without direct experience of the topic or situation your coachee is facing. This brings objectivity and develops in the coachee capability which will be replicated by them long after a coaching programme has ended. 

Where a coach has experience of the work, situation or topic the coachee has presented for coaching however, there is an opportunity for the coach to bring insights, options and questions to the table which are positively informed by past experience. I have for example leadership, business development, sales and change experience which I can choose to apply for the benefits of my clients based upon their individual needs. 

It must be noted however that there lays a significant responsibility on my part (and those who coach) to use this experience under the intention of what will serve my clients needs the greatest. The proviso must always be that any experience, reflections or options provided during the course of coaching are purely that, insights to promote and prompt further reflection and ideas, rather than the choice the coachee should make. 

Piqued you’re interest? 

As part of making a decision to seek and be coached, it’s important that you have the opportunity to experience what coaching is. That’s why I offer an initial consultation session during which we will explore the opportunities that coaching could address for you and you can experience my approach.

If you’d like to experience what working with a coach is like…

If you’d like to experience what working with me is like, get in touch and we’ll see if coaching is right for you. I’d love to speak with you via:

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

What my clients have said…

“After Meeting Stefan it was his passion to understand the business and work with us as a partner…Stefan has been really valuable in guiding us as a company on our journey of cultural change, his passion to ensure we succeed as a company shines through…Thank you, we look forward to our continuing journey” Paul Hunt – Managing Director – Phoebus Software Ltd

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials

3 ways to use the blog; The 6 traits of great change leaders 

Change is no simple task, no matter what the books or consultants might say. Whilst the benefits may be many, the emotions, physical and mental development required and the practical implications of change mean that we all ‘struggle’ in different ways when asked to change.

Below are 3 ways to use my blog: The 6 traits of great change leaders 

The 6 key traits of great change leaders outlined in my blog are:
  • Compassion
  • Humility
  • Authenticity
  • Narrative
  • Goals
  • Enthusiasm
1) Score yourself 
Score yourself on a scale of 0 – 10 (where 10 is high) on how well you believe you are performing in each of the 6 elements above. Which are your greatest strengths and which are your greatest opportunities to enhance your change leadership?
Once you’ve identified your strengths ask yourself:
  • A) How could I use these strengths to be even more effective in change?
  • B) How will I use the strengths I’ve identified?
  • C) What will be the impact when I do?
Once you’ve identified which of the six elements, when improved, would have the biggest impact on your change leadership effectiveness, ask yourself:
  • A) What could I do to increase my score in this topic by one point?
  • B) What will I do from the ideas I’ve generated?
  • C) What will be the impact when I do?
2) Ask others to score you
Ask your team and your peers to score you for each element above on a scale of 0 – 10 (where 10 is high) gauging how well they believe that you perform in the 7 elements above. Which are your greatest strengths and which are your greatest opportunities to enhance your change leadership?
  • Repeat the steps A) B) and C) above.
3) Reflect as a leadership team on your collective and individual performance
  • A) How could we use these strengths to be even more effective in change?
  • B) How will we use the strengths we’ve identified?
  • C) What will be the impact when we do?
Once you’ve identified which of the six elements, when improved, would have the biggest impact on your change leadership effectiveness, ask yourselves:
  • A) What could we do to increase our score in this topic by one point?
  • B) What will we do from the ideas we’ve generated?
  • C) What will be the impact when we do?
I’d love to hear your reflections.

If you’d like more answers…

If you or your people would like more answers or are unsure of how to proceed; drop me a note or a call, I’d love to speak with you

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

What my clients have said…

Stefan has a great skill as a coach in his ability to ask insightful questions at the most opportune times. This enables detailed interrogation of critical situations and has facilitated significant shifts in my thinking to take place. I  have no hesitation in recommending him and his excellent work.” Vanessa Clarke, Director of Undergraduate Leadership Development Programmes at Birmingham City University

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials

The 6 traits of great change leaders 

The 6 traits of great change leaders

Change is no simple task, no matter what the books or consultants might say. Whilst the benefits may be many, the emotions, physical and mental development required and the practical implications of change mean that we all ‘struggle’ in different ways when asked to change

During the organisational change that I have observed, helped to facilitate and lead, there have always been 6 key traits exhibited by the leadership team; for and with their people:

  • Compassion
  • Humility
  • Authenticity
  • Narrative
  • Goals
  • Enthusiasm 
How are you measuring up? Let’s take a look…
Compassion
Change is about letting go of past and current habits, bonds to working practices and feelings and approaches that took time and energy to commit to. It’s also about building emotions to an (as yet) uncertain future and taking the time to understand the emotions, concerns and excitement of those within (and on the outside of) the change ahead. 

Compassion is also about identifying and ensuring that we fill the voids created by the change. You cannot leave an empty space where something would have been, the space needs to be replaced by something new, whether it be emotional or physical. 

Showing compassion doesn’t mean that we take those on the journey who are not willing to make the change or able to, even if they see it’s benefits, but it does mean that we can show compassion towards the emotions and reasons that have caused it and ensure we have given direction or autonomy as needed before making decisions on a persons desire.

As human beings, we are compelled to work with, follow and support those who can acknowledge, support and challenge the emotional connections individuals, teams and work forces have to the past, present and future. Ensuring you apply compassion and understanding ahead of, during and following the change will mean others will follow and not feel forced to change.

Questions to reflect upon
  • How much compassion are you showing ahead of, during and following change? 
  • Would your people agree and would your customers?
  • If you don’t show compassion, how likely are your people when the going gets tough?
Humility
Change has so many facets, twists and turns that no one person can deliver organisational change alone, or has all of the answers. By recognising the ability of others, the insight, skill, support and passion that those around you can bring, you will increase the level of engagement, co-responsibility and commitment to the change proposed. In turn, you will share the challenges and successes of the change throughout and ensure a far greater outcome.
This doesn’t mean letting go of your ambitions, but it does mean leading the change, finding others to govern and manage it, design it, support it, deliver it and work with you to evaluate it. Create a great governance process to ensure you deliver the aims you seek together and work less hard than you will without it.
I know this sounds like standard project fare but I’m sure you’ve seen as many project as I have, where this is in not in play. It wears you as the ‘leader’ out and undermines the part your people want to play.
Questions to consider:
  • How humble and open are you being towards your people and their ideas about how the change can be achieved? 
  • Would your people agree? 
  • Would the person on the street?
  • If you aren’t humble enough to be open, why should your people?
Authenticity
Change requires faith, on some occasions, ‘blind’ faith to a future that has not yet been seen, touched or (as yet) realised. A key requirement within effective change is to be authentically true to yourself your values and your people. This requires being truthful about the benefits of the change as you see them and the why of that change. You need to be open about the challenges you will face, your optimism about how readily you can overcome them together and outline why the challenges you will face are worth overcoming, in the short, medium and long term.
This doesn’t preclude you from being solution focused or from driving for change, it just means that you’re self aware enough to know that your people can spot when you’re trying to paint too rosey a picture and being open creates trust.
Questions to consider:
  • How honest are you being with yourself and your people about the benefits and likelihood of successful change, the expected highs and lows and the demands that will be faced? 
  • Would your people agree? 
  • Would the person on the street?
  • If you don’t believe, why should your people?
Narrative
Change is so much easier to accept when it is tangible. Take the time to attach the envisaged future to the past and the present by telling the story of how your organisation has successfully changed before. 
Discuss and highlight examples that have occurred previously and talk your people through the journey you’ll go on together; talk them through the plan, it’s stages and the intended milestones. 
Creating a change narrative heightens the recognition that change happens all the time and that you can and will get through change as you have all done before. Paint pictures of how this time will be different and how it will be similar. Describe how the change will either build on the great company you have or regain the greatness you once exhibited by describing what will be seen, heard and felt along the way and at its fruition.
Questions to consider:
  • How clear are you being with yourself and your people about the journey you’ll go on together and the difference that will be seen at the end?
  • Would your people agree? 
  • Would the person on the street?
  • If you can’t help your people to touch, taste, think, feel, see and hear what the future will bring, how do you propose that they will grab it with both hands and either pull themselves or it towards it?
Goals
Change cannot be recognised, celebrated or ‘tweaked’ if it cannot be measured. Ahead of the change agree what you want to achieve, see, hear, think and feel at the end of the change and at key milestones throughout the change. This will enable you to demonstrate progress and celebrate successes with your people and evaluate ways to build on that success.
We all need to believe that we are moving forward and that the changes and benefits we envisaged are being realised. Not having a clear goal (or narrative) in change, is like being told to “go and have a look and you’ll find it”, without being told what ‘it’ is or how to find it.
Questions to consider:
  • How well defined are the outcomes you seek?
  • Have your goals been co-created and bought into by your people or are your people being forced to change?
  • Would your people agree? 
  • Would your customers?
Enthusiasm
Change brings out the best and worst in others and before we move forward we need to believe that the outcome is possible and that we all hold the energy to make it happen. Be positive about the future and most of all yours and your peoples ability to make that change possible. If you don’t believe, why should they? And if you can’t believe in your people and they can’t believe in you, why should they come together to make the change happen?
Questions to consider:
  • What would need to change in order for both myself and our people to be able to take this step?
  • What could both myself and our people do to facilitate the change we seek and what will be the impact on them and our overall ambition when we do?
  • What if we don’t do that?

For 3 ways to use this article…
I hope you’ve found the above thought provoking. One of the key elements for change is the “how” of making it happen. If you’d like 3 ways to use the above to enhance your chance of change success, click HERE

If you’d like more answers…

If you or your people would like more answers or are unsure of how to proceed; drop me a note or a call, I’d love to speak with you

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

What my clients have said…

Stefan has a great skill as a coach in his ability to ask insightful questions at the most opportune times. This enables detailed interrogation of critical situations and has facilitated significant shifts in my thinking to take place. I  have no hesitation in recommending him and his excellent work.” Vanessa Clarke, Director of Undergraduate Leadership Development Programmes at Birmingham City University

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials

8 sure fire ways to find out what motivates your people

One of the key questions of our time is; how do we motivate our people? 

With greater recognition of the need to engage, inspire and motivate the modern day workforce, it’s easy to get lost in a sea of methodologies and theories. I like to keep it simple; below are 8 sure fire ways to find out: 

  1. Ask them 
  2. Ask them 
  3. Ask them 
  4. Ask them 
  5. Ask them 
  6. Ask them 
  7. Ask them 
  8. Ask them 

Yes I’m afraid you read it right; ask them. 

I could have written a blog outlining X, Y and Z theory, quoted the motivational theory of Maslow, Herzberg or Sinek but the truth is that they’ll only get you so close – the ball park. 

The reality is that there is an ‘I’ in team and it stands for individual and the need to identify, communicate to and meet individual motivations. The most effective way to do this is to ask your people. 

What thoughts are going through your mind? 

You might be thinking:

I can’t just ask them…

  • Qn: What would stop you? 

They wouldn’t tell me 

  • Qn: What would need to change in order for them to? 

That’ll never work 

  • Qn: What if it did? 

How do I ask that question 

  • Qn: How would you like to be asked? 

Simplicity and complications… 

It’s natural to be sceptical of simplicity, indeed Confucius
the Chinese teacher and philosopher once said “Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated” and we do. But it doesn’t have to be that way. 

If you’d like to work on taking this forward… 

If you or your people would like more answers or are unsure of how to take this forward; drop me a note or a call, I’d love to speak with you.

  • Twitter: @stefanpowell 
  • E-mail: stefan@yourleadershipcounsel.co.uk 
  • Phone +44 (0) 7736942382 

Who am I? Stefan Powell… 

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people. 

What my clients have said…

“They say you should surround yourself with positive people. If I could choose just one person it would very easy, it would be Stefan. I needed Stefan to help me to be more effective and drive the results. I cant praise and thank him enough for inspiring and motivating me. Whether you are an individual or a group Stefan is someone I would recommend to everyone.” Karen Sampford – Agent – NFU Mutual 

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials


Are you negatively or positively empowering your people? 

Are you negatively or positively empowering your people? 

I’m on a train hurtling towards London for a meeting to discuss the progress of a programme of cultural change I’m helping to facilitate. Reflecting on the great things I’ve seen and heard and the challenges and opportunities highlighted by the programme; I’m struck by some of the key leadership phrases or terms of our time and the impact seen as a result of how they are interpreted and applied in a negative and potentially damaging way.

I’m sure you’ve come across phrases including “having a can do attitude”, “being accountable”, and “leading from the front”. When these are applied in line with their positive intent, they make a considerable impact for good. When applied in a way that is counter to the original positive intention (at their worst used as an emotional ‘beating stick’ for underperformance) they do nothing but damage those on the end of them.

One such term (I may well look at the other terms another time) I regularly see being misappropriated is empowerment. There is a dramatic difference in its impact depending on how it is being applied and interpreted be it positively or negatively. What do I mean? Let’s take a look.

Positive Empowerment 


What does the word empowerment mean to you? If you view its interpretation positively, then it will no doubt mean that you have experienced positive empowerment and seek to provide it. Positive empowerment is given in a way that means those empowered feel trusted and deemed capable of great things; carrying out a task, creating a strategy or delivering outcomes in a way that they feel appropriate. 

As a result of being empowered in a positive way, the individual or team will be supported to an appropriate degree, challenged to come up with an approach to bridge a perceived gap and stretched, perhaps a little outside of their comfort zone, and left believing that they could bridge that gap.

On top of this, those positively empowered will be recognised along the way for the inputs they deliver and the outputs that arrived as a result of the quality of the actions they took. As a result the individual or team will grow in knowledge, belief and skill and self esteem, identity and status will be enhanced and those empowered will be left inspired, motivated and craving their next empowerment opportunity. Does this sound familiar?
  • Is this the type of empowerment you’ve received/been given?
  • Is this the type of empowerment you give to your people?
  • Would your people agree?
  • What will you start, stop and continue e as a result of your reflections?

Negative empowerment

Negative empowerment is where individuals and teams are empowered in a way that means they don’t feel trusted and whilst deemed capable of great things and able to carry out a task, they feel far from ready to do so.

When negatively empowered, no real account will be taken of true readiness and the stage of development of the individual to complete the task. There will have been little or no account or discussion had around previous experience of similar situations and the opportunity to draw on it or the additional direction (limited or otherwise) needed to get there.

As a result of being empowered in a negative way, individuals and teams will feel doubt, confusion and possibly even out of control. Supported to a degree lower than needed, the ’empowered’ will be challenged to come up with an approach; way beyond their comfort zone and there will be little clarity given, or co-created, on the inputs that will deliver the outputs sought or to the quality desired.

Negative empowerment risks the significant chance of undermining existing knowledge, belief and skill, self esteem, identity and status. Rather than feeling ready and craving the next empowerment opportunity those ’empowered’ may state that they don’t feel up to the job and ask to go back to old roles or ways of working. Sound familiar?

Is this the type of empowerment you’ve received/been given?
Is this the type of empowerment you give to your people?
Would your people agree?
What will you start, stop and continue e as a result of your reflections?

What am I seeing happening?

For all of the positive empowerment I have seen over the years, I’m noticing a worrying trend across not one but many organisations and many in ‘leadership’ roles for negative empowerment.

On some occasions, negative empowerment happens because those with the responsibility for empowering others don’t know how to empower and fail to seek the support they need. They feel unable to ask for it; even when they intuitively recognise it’s needed. 

On other occasions, it’s a wilful use of a ‘leaders’ perceived power to ask their people to work out for themselves what’s needed where the ‘leader’ has little or no clue of the changes needed to create the vision they seek or the capability to effectively facilitate/coach their people to co create it.

At its worst, the term empowerment is used in conjunction (implicitly or explicitly) with the terms “you are paid to deal with ambiguity” and “change is uncomfortable, you need to get comfortable to cope with change”, again hiding the ‘leaders’ own challenges with creating or providing clarity through change. 

Why is it happening?

The world is getting more complex, job roles and accountabilities wider and the pace of societal and organisational change is taking place at a pace far faster than ever before. We don’t always have the opportunity to reduce the pace of change, sometimes it’s thrust upon us, but we do have the choice about how we react to it. 

When we do have control over the pace of change, we need to exercise our own accountability and the empowerment we have as leaders to positively empower our people to deliver change. We need to ensure that we are not hiding behind an ego that says “I can’t let on that I don’t know” (even in private) for fear of undermining ourselves and instead, co create with our people the certainty we all need.

The reality is that we undermine our own leadership and the legacy we seek to leave every time we negatively empower those in our care; for that is the accountability that lies across the shoulders of leaders.

If you seek positive change, you need to be the change you seek and that means seeking clarity and co creating it. If we don’t, why should our people?

Questions to consider:
  • What am I thinking and feeling as a result of reading this blog?
  • What are those thoughts or feelings telling me or showing me I need to do?
  • What could I do?
  • What will I do (X) ?
  • What are the consequences of not doing X ? 
  • What are the benefits of doing X ?
Stefan 

If you’d like more answers…

If you or your people would like more answers or are unsure of how to proceed; drop me a note or a call, I’d love to speak with you

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

What my clients have said…

“After Meeting Stefan it was his passion to understand the business and work with us as a partner…Stefan has been really valuable in guiding us as a company on our journey of cultural change, his passion to ensure we succeed as a company shines through…Thank you, we look forward to our continuing journey” Paul Hunt – Managing Director – Phoebus Software Ltd

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials