Are you ready to lead your people into 2016?

It’s rapidly approaching the end of the year and if you’re anything like those that approach me to work with them; this year will either be falling at your feet in submission or standing over you asking what have you achieved this year?

No matter whether it’s been a great year or less than you’d intended, end of year reflections offer you the opportunity to renew and refresh.

The success that many of my leadership clients see, comes from accepting that “the most effective action often begins with a period of reflection, followed by acceptance and then planning”. My question for you is; Have you paused yet to reflect on this year? 

Reflections on your 2015

Here’s 12 questions to help bring a renewed sense of purpose, enthusiasm and the spark needed to make next year the success you want:

Repeating and building on success 

  • What did you aim to achieve this year?
  • What have you achieved?
  • What has gone well this year?
  • What have you done to bring this success about?
  • How could you see even more of this success in 2016?
  • What will it mean for you to repeat your successes?
  • What will you do and how will you know when you’ve been successful?

Opportunities to be even better

  • What didn’t you achieve this year?
  • Which of these elements will have the greatest impact for you and your people in 2016?
  • What would be the impact of seeing success in these elements for your business in 2016?
  • What would need to change in order for you to see success in the elements you have identified? 
  • What will you do and how will you know when you’ve been successful?

Having completed this exercise…

Having reflected on these 12 questions, you’re now ready to identify the success you wish to see and the changes you can make to bring this success about.

An extra question 

Too often we define the activities that need to change but forget to consider who we need to be in order to deliver those changes. Now consider this:

  • Who do you need to remain/become in order to repeat and build on the success you achieved in 2015?

I’d love to hear your thoughts.

In the meantime have a wonderful end to 2015.

Stefan

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

7 Must Do’s for leaders… 

7 Must Do’s for leaders… 

If you want to be a leader it’s important you know what you’re getting yourself into.

Not for the faint hearted or for those that are only focused on what they can get out of it for themselves; leadership requires the determination to improve, no matter the personal cost and significantly more than innate ability alone.

Anyone can go on a course, apply for a leadership role but in order to become a leader you need to assure yourself you can do the following and then some:

1) Commit

Leadership isn’t a mantle you pick up and put down as you clock in and clock out; it’s a way of living and breathing.

It’s about living and breathing your values in the search of truth and delivery of outcomes for the common good and being at the end of the telephone ready to answer questions or pose them; day or night.

Leadership is about keeping your head when all around you are losing theirs (whilst inside you might be screaming); striving to be better than you were yesterday because you believe in being the best you can be and setting the best example.

Leadership takes absolute commitment.

2) Learn

Leadership is about learning about the world around you, in front of you and behind you. It’s about understanding people, processes, cultures, strategies and your arse from your elbow.

Learning takes time, reflection and an openness to being wrong and learning from it. Asking for help and ideas from your people just as much as seeking support from mentors or ‘elders’.

Leadership is about hiring people whom are better than you; having the self belief that you can provide an environment in which they will flourish and you will learn and grow too.

Leadership is about learning from yourself and others.

3) Practice

Leadership is about practising what you preach and striving to refine and improve what you do and how you do it. Not just what you say and how you say it.

It’s about putting in more hours practicing your speech, 1:1’s and board meetings than you took practicing to pass your driving test (anywhere between 20 and 40 hours).

Leadership is about asking for feedback and acting on that feedback, practicing until you’ve got good enough to show and develop others to walk beyond theirs and your weaknesses.

Leaders know that practice makes perfect and practice, practice, practice themselves.

3) Reflect

Leaders don’t just act they reflect and reflection is tough when you feel like you’ve little time to breath let alone pause and consider; what’s working well, what isn’t and what’s the best thing to do about it.

It’s about reflecting on the impact of a decision today, tomorrow and in the future. On your customer, your people, your performance and your organisation before and whilst making a decision.

Leadership is about reflecting on how far you’ve travelled and how far you have yet to go; reflecting on whether you and your people can make it the whole way or whether one of you has to go, for the greater good.

Leaders reflect to ensure they start faster and finish stronger.

4) Plan

Leadership involves planning and not because someone says so; because you know it really does lead to P.P.P…

It’s about identifying what good looks like, your current reality and identifying what you need to do to bridge the gap; not just tomorrow but the next day and the next day and the next.

Leadership is about recognising that there is always pressure to act, but only the weak lash out; the strong bide their time.

5) Prioritise

Leadership is about recognising that there are only so many hours in a day and miles in a mind.

It’s about starting less and finishing more and knowing what to start, what to stop and what to continue.

Leadership is about knowing who to invite to the table and who not; picking the individual over the many and the many over the few.

Leadership is picking your battles to ensure your people and customers win their war.

6) Put people first

Leadership is about people not processes, policies or machines and the recognition that without people you are nothing is paramount.

It’s about winning hearts as well as minds and helping people to be who they wish to be whilst helping you and your customers on their own journeys.

Leadership is about recognising that we all have wants, hopes, fears and needs and knowing that only when these are addressed are we able to deliver on our promises and not fall on our knees.

Leadership is about people becoming who they were destined to be.

7) Juggle tomorrow

Leadership is about tomorrow; poor management is about today.

It’s about recognising that tomorrow is effected by a single misplaced action whilst holding onto the pragmatic; all is not lost today.

Leadership is creating a tomorrow worth fighting for and a legacy beyond bricks and mortar and sometimes that requires putting off until tomorrow that which cannot be git right today.

Leadership is executing today and tomorrow in the same breath.

It’s not a complete list…

This list isn’t a complete list of attributes, skills or a crib sheet for success; I’ll save that for another day. But If you can step up to the plate and really embrace these elements and believe you can do them you can without doubt be a leader.

The question is do you want to…enough

Questions to consider:

  • How are you measuring up?
  • What would it mean for you to be able to stand confidently against each of these elements
  • What will it mean for you if you don’t?
    If you’d like more insights…

If you’d like help with any of the above elements of leadership; I’d love to work with you.

Twitter: @stefanpowell
E-mail: stefan@yourleadershipcounsel.co.uk
Phone +44 (0) 7736942382

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

What my clients have said…


“Stefan has been fundamental in bringing about behavioural change in the leadership population”. Paul Waters – Leading Retail Transformation Programme – Santander

12 ways to inspire…

12 ways to Inspire…

One of the greatest feelings in leadership has to be being told that you have inspired others. It’s a magical feeling that brings an incredible sense of achievement and pride and shines a light on the impact you have on others.
Long after the bricks and mortar you helped to build have been bulldozed, the policies and processes you oversaw been replaced and the shareholders you appeased found a new focus for their investments, your ability to inspire will enable you to leave your greatest leadership legacy.
Being inspired makes people reach for the unattainable, try harder than ever before, and stand up for what your organisation stands for in the face of adversity. It means that your people talk about the lessons they learned from you, the responsibility you empowered in them and that your values and approach live on. Think about your best boss…
That’s great, but how do you do ‘it’
That’s great, but how do you do ‘it’; inspire others? Here’s 12 ways that I’ve seen work wonders on the inspiration front. Let me know if you can think of more.
1) Do what you say you will do
Too often we promise things in the heat of the moment to appease and maintain credibility. When we fail to fulfil our promises we begin to erode the belief your people have in everything you say.
2) Treat people equally but differently
Your people have an internal sense of what is right and fair. The treatment of others in a way that creates the impression of favourites within your people, for example, will create a divide. When your people feel that they will be treated equally but that they will be considered as individuals with individual needs, they will come together.
3) Provide quality time
Nothing says more to your people about how much you value them than the amount of time (no matter how busy you are) that you are willing to spend with them; especially when it adds value.
4) Discuss your own weaknesses and your journey to overcome adversity
We tend to share less about ourselves, when we feel that we have done all of the opening up. As a leader the ability to share your journey and the challenges you have faced means that your people will believe that they can fulfil their potential and that you won’t judge them on the road to success. 
5) Listen to your people
When you take the time to listen to your people they feel valued, you learn, they learn and you connect to a much greater level. Think about how you feel when someone listens to you and how different it feels when you’re talked at. 
6) Help people overcome the barriers they face
People feel great when they are doing something they feel good at and it feels like nothing can get in their way. When you help your people to unlock the door to their success they and you feel great and you will have empowered the individual or team to deliver the value they seek. In turn, you will have created a connection with those you’ve helped that will last a lifetime.
7)  Ask other people for their suggestions
None of us have all of the answers and to pretend otherwise is fool hardy. When you seek the suggestions of those around you, you say I value you and believe in your capability.
8) Demonstrate belief in others by giving them responsibility for important stuff
Remember how it felt the first time your parents let you go into town on your own? Your people feel this way every time you empower them to make decisions and take action – no matter how senior.
9) Thank others for making mistakes
This recognises that your people are human, that they had the bravery to try and that you value initiative. What’s more it means they’ll try again and no doubt succeed beyond even their wildest dreams.
10) Invite feedback from your people
This demonstrates openness, respect and a lack of ego and you’ll get some valuable insights into how you can be an even better leader too.
11) Be your values
It’s easy say what you stand for and far less to act congruently at all times, but you have to or at least acknowledge when you haven’t. To act in a way that flies in the face of what you say undermines everything you say. For o leader there is no such thing as “do as I say, not as I do”.
12) Hold people to account

It is a human trait to choose the path of least resistance and it’s far too easy to say “if you want it bad enough you’ll make it happen”. We all fall off the horse sometimes and (maybe not in the moment) in the long term we’re usually grateful that someone challenged us to get back on it.
13) Let people be they best that THEY can be

I thought I’d throw in an extra one for free – you’re unlucky to be in the end of this one.

Its one thing to develop and empower your people; quite another to seek to create mini me’s. The very thing that stands out about you inspires others is your individual character. So bring out the best in them and let their light shine. 

If you’d like to talk through…

If you or your people would like to talk through any of the above, drop me a note or a call, I’d love to speak with you

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

What my clients have said…

“I always come away from a meeting with Stefan re-energized, re-focussed and brimming with enthusiasm for the world. Not only is he insightful, provocative and intelligent in his comments & questions … he’s also great company!”

Joanna Moyle – Director – Iviva Consulting

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials

3 ways to use the blog; The 6 traits of great change leaders 

Change is no simple task, no matter what the books or consultants might say. Whilst the benefits may be many, the emotions, physical and mental development required and the practical implications of change mean that we all ‘struggle’ in different ways when asked to change.

Below are 3 ways to use my blog: The 6 traits of great change leaders 

The 6 key traits of great change leaders outlined in my blog are:
  • Compassion
  • Humility
  • Authenticity
  • Narrative
  • Goals
  • Enthusiasm
1) Score yourself 
Score yourself on a scale of 0 – 10 (where 10 is high) on how well you believe you are performing in each of the 6 elements above. Which are your greatest strengths and which are your greatest opportunities to enhance your change leadership?
Once you’ve identified your strengths ask yourself:
  • A) How could I use these strengths to be even more effective in change?
  • B) How will I use the strengths I’ve identified?
  • C) What will be the impact when I do?
Once you’ve identified which of the six elements, when improved, would have the biggest impact on your change leadership effectiveness, ask yourself:
  • A) What could I do to increase my score in this topic by one point?
  • B) What will I do from the ideas I’ve generated?
  • C) What will be the impact when I do?
2) Ask others to score you
Ask your team and your peers to score you for each element above on a scale of 0 – 10 (where 10 is high) gauging how well they believe that you perform in the 7 elements above. Which are your greatest strengths and which are your greatest opportunities to enhance your change leadership?
  • Repeat the steps A) B) and C) above.
3) Reflect as a leadership team on your collective and individual performance
  • A) How could we use these strengths to be even more effective in change?
  • B) How will we use the strengths we’ve identified?
  • C) What will be the impact when we do?
Once you’ve identified which of the six elements, when improved, would have the biggest impact on your change leadership effectiveness, ask yourselves:
  • A) What could we do to increase our score in this topic by one point?
  • B) What will we do from the ideas we’ve generated?
  • C) What will be the impact when we do?
I’d love to hear your reflections.

If you’d like more answers…

If you or your people would like more answers or are unsure of how to proceed; drop me a note or a call, I’d love to speak with you

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

What my clients have said…

Stefan has a great skill as a coach in his ability to ask insightful questions at the most opportune times. This enables detailed interrogation of critical situations and has facilitated significant shifts in my thinking to take place. I  have no hesitation in recommending him and his excellent work.” Vanessa Clarke, Director of Undergraduate Leadership Development Programmes at Birmingham City University

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials

The 6 traits of great change leaders 

The 6 traits of great change leaders

Change is no simple task, no matter what the books or consultants might say. Whilst the benefits may be many, the emotions, physical and mental development required and the practical implications of change mean that we all ‘struggle’ in different ways when asked to change

During the organisational change that I have observed, helped to facilitate and lead, there have always been 6 key traits exhibited by the leadership team; for and with their people:

  • Compassion
  • Humility
  • Authenticity
  • Narrative
  • Goals
  • Enthusiasm 
How are you measuring up? Let’s take a look…
Compassion
Change is about letting go of past and current habits, bonds to working practices and feelings and approaches that took time and energy to commit to. It’s also about building emotions to an (as yet) uncertain future and taking the time to understand the emotions, concerns and excitement of those within (and on the outside of) the change ahead. 

Compassion is also about identifying and ensuring that we fill the voids created by the change. You cannot leave an empty space where something would have been, the space needs to be replaced by something new, whether it be emotional or physical. 

Showing compassion doesn’t mean that we take those on the journey who are not willing to make the change or able to, even if they see it’s benefits, but it does mean that we can show compassion towards the emotions and reasons that have caused it and ensure we have given direction or autonomy as needed before making decisions on a persons desire.

As human beings, we are compelled to work with, follow and support those who can acknowledge, support and challenge the emotional connections individuals, teams and work forces have to the past, present and future. Ensuring you apply compassion and understanding ahead of, during and following the change will mean others will follow and not feel forced to change.

Questions to reflect upon
  • How much compassion are you showing ahead of, during and following change? 
  • Would your people agree and would your customers?
  • If you don’t show compassion, how likely are your people when the going gets tough?
Humility
Change has so many facets, twists and turns that no one person can deliver organisational change alone, or has all of the answers. By recognising the ability of others, the insight, skill, support and passion that those around you can bring, you will increase the level of engagement, co-responsibility and commitment to the change proposed. In turn, you will share the challenges and successes of the change throughout and ensure a far greater outcome.
This doesn’t mean letting go of your ambitions, but it does mean leading the change, finding others to govern and manage it, design it, support it, deliver it and work with you to evaluate it. Create a great governance process to ensure you deliver the aims you seek together and work less hard than you will without it.
I know this sounds like standard project fare but I’m sure you’ve seen as many project as I have, where this is in not in play. It wears you as the ‘leader’ out and undermines the part your people want to play.
Questions to consider:
  • How humble and open are you being towards your people and their ideas about how the change can be achieved? 
  • Would your people agree? 
  • Would the person on the street?
  • If you aren’t humble enough to be open, why should your people?
Authenticity
Change requires faith, on some occasions, ‘blind’ faith to a future that has not yet been seen, touched or (as yet) realised. A key requirement within effective change is to be authentically true to yourself your values and your people. This requires being truthful about the benefits of the change as you see them and the why of that change. You need to be open about the challenges you will face, your optimism about how readily you can overcome them together and outline why the challenges you will face are worth overcoming, in the short, medium and long term.
This doesn’t preclude you from being solution focused or from driving for change, it just means that you’re self aware enough to know that your people can spot when you’re trying to paint too rosey a picture and being open creates trust.
Questions to consider:
  • How honest are you being with yourself and your people about the benefits and likelihood of successful change, the expected highs and lows and the demands that will be faced? 
  • Would your people agree? 
  • Would the person on the street?
  • If you don’t believe, why should your people?
Narrative
Change is so much easier to accept when it is tangible. Take the time to attach the envisaged future to the past and the present by telling the story of how your organisation has successfully changed before. 
Discuss and highlight examples that have occurred previously and talk your people through the journey you’ll go on together; talk them through the plan, it’s stages and the intended milestones. 
Creating a change narrative heightens the recognition that change happens all the time and that you can and will get through change as you have all done before. Paint pictures of how this time will be different and how it will be similar. Describe how the change will either build on the great company you have or regain the greatness you once exhibited by describing what will be seen, heard and felt along the way and at its fruition.
Questions to consider:
  • How clear are you being with yourself and your people about the journey you’ll go on together and the difference that will be seen at the end?
  • Would your people agree? 
  • Would the person on the street?
  • If you can’t help your people to touch, taste, think, feel, see and hear what the future will bring, how do you propose that they will grab it with both hands and either pull themselves or it towards it?
Goals
Change cannot be recognised, celebrated or ‘tweaked’ if it cannot be measured. Ahead of the change agree what you want to achieve, see, hear, think and feel at the end of the change and at key milestones throughout the change. This will enable you to demonstrate progress and celebrate successes with your people and evaluate ways to build on that success.
We all need to believe that we are moving forward and that the changes and benefits we envisaged are being realised. Not having a clear goal (or narrative) in change, is like being told to “go and have a look and you’ll find it”, without being told what ‘it’ is or how to find it.
Questions to consider:
  • How well defined are the outcomes you seek?
  • Have your goals been co-created and bought into by your people or are your people being forced to change?
  • Would your people agree? 
  • Would your customers?
Enthusiasm
Change brings out the best and worst in others and before we move forward we need to believe that the outcome is possible and that we all hold the energy to make it happen. Be positive about the future and most of all yours and your peoples ability to make that change possible. If you don’t believe, why should they? And if you can’t believe in your people and they can’t believe in you, why should they come together to make the change happen?
Questions to consider:
  • What would need to change in order for both myself and our people to be able to take this step?
  • What could both myself and our people do to facilitate the change we seek and what will be the impact on them and our overall ambition when we do?
  • What if we don’t do that?

For 3 ways to use this article…
I hope you’ve found the above thought provoking. One of the key elements for change is the “how” of making it happen. If you’d like 3 ways to use the above to enhance your chance of change success, click HERE

If you’d like more answers…

If you or your people would like more answers or are unsure of how to proceed; drop me a note or a call, I’d love to speak with you

Who am I? Stefan Powell…

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people.

What my clients have said…

Stefan has a great skill as a coach in his ability to ask insightful questions at the most opportune times. This enables detailed interrogation of critical situations and has facilitated significant shifts in my thinking to take place. I  have no hesitation in recommending him and his excellent work.” Vanessa Clarke, Director of Undergraduate Leadership Development Programmes at Birmingham City University

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials

8 sure fire ways to find out what motivates your people

One of the key questions of our time is; how do we motivate our people? 

With greater recognition of the need to engage, inspire and motivate the modern day workforce, it’s easy to get lost in a sea of methodologies and theories. I like to keep it simple; below are 8 sure fire ways to find out: 

  1. Ask them 
  2. Ask them 
  3. Ask them 
  4. Ask them 
  5. Ask them 
  6. Ask them 
  7. Ask them 
  8. Ask them 

Yes I’m afraid you read it right; ask them. 

I could have written a blog outlining X, Y and Z theory, quoted the motivational theory of Maslow, Herzberg or Sinek but the truth is that they’ll only get you so close – the ball park. 

The reality is that there is an ‘I’ in team and it stands for individual and the need to identify, communicate to and meet individual motivations. The most effective way to do this is to ask your people. 

What thoughts are going through your mind? 

You might be thinking:

I can’t just ask them…

  • Qn: What would stop you? 

They wouldn’t tell me 

  • Qn: What would need to change in order for them to? 

That’ll never work 

  • Qn: What if it did? 

How do I ask that question 

  • Qn: How would you like to be asked? 

Simplicity and complications… 

It’s natural to be sceptical of simplicity, indeed Confucius
the Chinese teacher and philosopher once said “Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated” and we do. But it doesn’t have to be that way. 

If you’d like to work on taking this forward… 

If you or your people would like more answers or are unsure of how to take this forward; drop me a note or a call, I’d love to speak with you.

  • Twitter: @stefanpowell 
  • E-mail: stefan@yourleadershipcounsel.co.uk 
  • Phone +44 (0) 7736942382 

Who am I? Stefan Powell… 

I am yourleadershipcounsel, a father, husband, part time rock star and passionately bonkers about helping leaders get the most from themselves and their people. 

What my clients have said…

“They say you should surround yourself with positive people. If I could choose just one person it would very easy, it would be Stefan. I needed Stefan to help me to be more effective and drive the results. I cant praise and thank him enough for inspiring and motivating me. Whether you are an individual or a group Stefan is someone I would recommend to everyone.” Karen Sampford – Agent – NFU Mutual 

Read more testimonials here: Testimonials


7 Steps Towards Increasing Worldwide Employee Engagement Scores

7 Steps Towards Increasing Worldwide Employee Engagement Scores

Employee engagement – two words which will either delight or frustrate you. Two words which can and will be the difference between you and your competitors and two words which, whilst greatly understood, are often poorly applied in practice for a wide variety of reasons.

A recent Gallup studyfound that only 13% of employees worldwide are engaged in the work they do. What’s more, the study found that 24% of those employees polled are “actively disengaged, indicating they are unhappy and unproductive at work and liable to spread negativity to coworkers”.

As you’ll see from clicking on the link, in “rough numbers, this translates into 900 million not engaged and 340 million actively disengaged workers around the globe” and “just one in eight (employees) fully involved in and enthusiastic about their jobs”.

But why? When we know it’s so important…

I’d say that the predominant reason is that employee and organisational expectations are increasing. Put simply, we live in a world where we expect more for less. When you combine this with an insufficient improvement in the ability of many organisations to engage their people in any way other than financially – you have a recipe for engagement disaster.

As expectations grow and the demands on employees and organisations get even higher, the desire to push and demand performance (both ways) becomes even more intense and the requirements on our organisations to ‘pause’ and engage, whilst still moving forwards means that keeping engagement at the forefront of the mind is even more challenging, ironically when the ‘time’ to employ it is at it’s peak.

Employee self awareness….

In addition to the inability of many organisations to effectively capture the spirit of their people, many employees may have a sense or feeling of dissatisfaction in the work they do, but are often unaware of what truly and consciously drives them, which in turn means that they are unable to ask for, seek it or indeed definitively acknowledge when it is met.

The answer?

In my experience, more needs to be done to increase understanding of what an engaging organisation looks, sounds and feels like and of what effective engagement is.

We need to increase belief in the value of engagement and how you actually do it; we can no longer just talk passionately about the concept or about the need to engage.

We need to ‘pin down’ in our organisations, what effective engagement for our employees is today and for tomorrow and train, coach, observe and give feedback on the effectiveness of our leaders doing it. A workshop where we talk about it, say we can do it and then hide in the shadows following it, is simply not cutting the mustard.

We need to change the mindset that engagement is all about being ‘fluffy’ and ‘nice’, to a recognition that engagement delivers ‘hard’ outcomes and is more than ‘just’ a ‘soft’ skill.

We need to embrace the importance of engagement as a way of life, rather than an annual survey, finding as many opportunities as possible, to connect ourselves and our people to our organisations, as human beings.

We need to build compelling organisations, ones with real purpose and strategy, designed to truly make a difference, where financial success is the outcome of compulsion, not in-spite of it.

We need to acknowledge that it takes time, practice and commitment to engage at a deeper level, so that we recognise the need to stop brushing engagement off as ‘easy’ and something we “already do”.

We need to spend more time raising our conscious awareness of what’s important to each and everyone of us. To do this, is not pointless navel gazing, it’s about ensuring that we can be engaged. If you know what motivates and drives you and your people you can begin to build a compelling purpose and identify strategies for engaging your people, in each and every conversation you have and every communication you make.

Engagement; start with yourself today…7 steps

In order to engage, you first need to know what engages you and how engaged you are by what you and your organisation do. Once you know this, you can begin to identify ways to increase your personal level of engagement and in turn that of others.

Here’s 7 steps to help you identify what drives, motivates and engages you.

Step 1) Grab an A4 sheet of plain paper and write “what is important to me in work?” at the top of the sheet.

Step 2) List as many answers as you can think of and then write even more.

Step 3) Group your answers together under words or phrases that really resonate with you.

Step 4) Rank your answers/groups based on least and most important to you.

Step 5) Look at and reflect on your top five. You now have a window into what drives, inspires and engages you most in work.

Step 6) On a scale of 0 – 10, where 10 is I’m getting as much of this met as I’d like and 0 is I’m getting none of this, rate your current level of satisfaction for each of your top 5.

Step 7) Ask yourself the following 5 questions, A – E:

A) What would being able to rate yourself one point higher, in each of your top 5, mean for you, your family and your organisation?
B) What would need to change in order for you to score each of your top 5 at least one point higher?
C) What could you do to bring that increase in score about?
D) What will you do to bring that increase in score about and by when?
E) What support or challenge would you benefit from in order to make the change you’ve identified?

Having completed this exercise, you should have begun to define with greater clarity, what ‘engages’ you and what you could do to increase your level of connectedness to your organisation.

An opportunity…

The 7 steps also presents an opportunity for you to help your colleagues identify what drives and motivates them and is a wonderful platform for discussion with your people.

If you’d like me to work through these questions with you, for me to work with your people to help them (and you) identify what motivates and drives them, and how you can begin engage your people to an even greater degree, get in touch today – I’d love to help you.

Stefan

Stefan Powell – Your Leadership Counsel

Tel: +44 (0) 77369 42382

E-mail: stefan@yourleadershipcounsel.co.uk

Website: http://www.yourleadershipcounsel.co.uk

Stefan Powell is Your Leadership Counsel and has been developing leaders, teams and organisational capability for change for well over a decade. Inspiring, committed and devoted to the success of his clients, he excels in working 1:1 with leaders and business owners to bring increases in performance, inspiration, clarity and focus to everything they do.

Sample testimonial

“Inspirational – easy, thorough and methodical to work with while also intuitive, imaginative, creative, incredibly flexible and very accommodating”. Wendy Stern – Chair of Action For Involvement – www.actionforinvolvement.org.uk